TRPM2 modulates neutrophil attraction to murine tumor cells by regulating CXCL2 expression

Cancer kills millions of people every year and is one of humanity’s greatest health challenges. In recent years, immune cells were shown to play critical roles in tumor growth and metastatic progression.

The environment where tumor cells live consists of a wide range of cell types, among them immune cells. Even though the power is there, immune cells tend to fail fighting malignant cells.

In addition, neutrophils, white blood cells, do fight infections but help tumors to grow. When treating cancer, neutrophils can, via direct cytotoxicity, limit tumor progression and even eliminate tumor cells. For this to happen, neutrophils need to reach the tumor cells and identify them.

The film shows sequences where neutrophils (white) are moving toward tumor cells and then attacking them, and sequences where they move away from the tumor cells.

The research team used HoloMonitor, and Hstudio (in the article they write “HoloMonitor Imaging” and “HolostudioTM software”) for analysis.

 

 

The paper TRPM2 modulates neutrophil attraction to murine tumor cells by regulating CXCL2 expression was written by:

Maya Gershkovitz · Tanya Fainsod‑Levi · Tamir Zelter · Ronit V. Sionov · Zvi Granot at the Department of Developmental Biology and Cancer Research, Institute for Medical Research Israel Canada, Hebrew University Medical School, Ein Kerem, 91120, Jerusalem, Israel.